CDC, states investigating new reports of possible sexual transmission of Zika virus

AHA News Now

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state public health departments are investigating 14 additional reports of possible sexual transmission of the Zika virus, including several involving pregnant women, CDC announced yesterday. Meanwhile, the agency strongly encourages public health officials, clinicians and the public to adhere to current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly for men with pregnant partners. Recent evidence suggests a possible association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal outcomes, such as microcephaly. Until more is known, CDC strongly advises pregnant women to consider postponing travel to Zika-affected areas, or talk to their health care provider before they do and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites during the trip. For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/zika and www.aha.org/zika. The Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee expects to mark up two Zika-related bills on March 9, Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) said at a hearing today on the virus. The bills are a part of the committee’s Innovations package, a companion to the House-passed 21st Century Cures bill. The Adding Zika Virus to the FDA Priority Review Voucher Program Act (S. 2512/H.R. 4400) would add Zika to the Priority Review Voucher Program, which awards vouchers to sponsors of new drug and biological products approved to prevent or treat certain diseases. The Medical Countermeasure Innovation Act (S. 2055) aims to encourage the development of medical countermeasures for Zika and other public health threats.

Topic: Advocacy and Public Policy
Tags: preparedness, Zika

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